From Presence

Away from procrastination and overthinking and towards exploring thoughts, concepts and things.

When I started this blog some years ago I attempted to focus exclusively on leadership, business and creativity. I’d originally called it Commerce and Creativity with notion of writing about the intersection of the two. I’m still interested in both with my work as a marketer, but am making a pivot.

I tend to think both linearly and in circles, sometimes very practical and other times not so much. I try to find humor in the everyday and mundane, bringing out my inner child while working hard to be a serious adult focused on serious business. The truth is, I like both. It’s not ‘either or,’ but ‘and. ‘

Another thing about me is I tend to like to keep my options open. It’s been tough to commit to a narrow focus for this blog as well as find and stick with a design that resonated with me. It’s taken a long time to find the right template for both writing and photography that didn’t require an outside developer to implement.

I think I’ve found it in this new design I’m launching with this first post in over a year. It’s been well over a year of over thinking both the design and writing. On the writing side, there’s so much great writing by wonderful people like Mitch Joel, Ann Handley and Maria Popova, and Kevin Kelly and of course Seth Godin that I questioned why and what I would write that might be of value rather than creating more noise.

I can hear Seth admonishing me now to start and do something, and that in the year I spent procrastinating I could have written a book via regular posts. What I haven’t waivered on is my daily iPhone photo over at Mundaily. That’s become such a habit those posts just sort of happen.

That said, I’m going to try again. I’m finally getting my digital ‘home’ in order. I’m going to follow through and finish things rather than start and stop, leaving digital detritus lying across the Internet. I’m going to complete shooting the series of Oregon Coast Bridges designed by Conde McCullough – a project I started in August 2011. And with this design I finally found a gallery theme I connect with to show a few of the photos clogging more than a few hard drives.

As for what I’ll write about? I’m going to let go and use this space to share my observations on business, art, life and things in between. I don’t know exactly where this will go, but I hope it will offer insights on work, inspiration on life and what it means to live rather than blindly go through the motions each day. I know you need to show up regularly if you want to build readership., and I’ll post when I have something I think is worth sharing, and develop a rhythm that’s sustainable.

Some posts will be better than others, but my wish is that you, the reader, finds nuggets that help you in your work and your life. Even just a bit. Thanks for stopping by!

The future is unknowable

UnknowableFuture

This might be obvious to you. Or maybe not. We develop plans, anxiety and fret over what might be or might not. We do our best to control it. Sure, you want – and need – to plan for the future. Like saving for retirement, rainy days and life’s major events. You buy insurance to protect yourself from adversity.

I just finished Daniel Kahneman’s Thinking Fast and Slow where he talks about the unknowable future and the many people who make their living predicting what will happen – the housing bubble, for instance. Or 9/11. Pundits proclaimed they knew the financial crisis would strike, but not exactly when. But what Daniel lays out is that it’s easy to say you knew it would happen in the rearview. With time, our minds alter the stories we tell ourselves. He shows how what we experience and what we remember differ greatly. Vacations and arduous adventures like mountain climbing are often much better after the fact.

Experience allows you to have intuitions and spot trends, but you don’t know things in advance because you can’t. It’s the future after all, and there’s no crystal ball no matter how badly you and everyone else wants one.

Knowing this should bring a little relief as you stand making New Year’s resolutions and pondering what the year will bring. How much of what you predicted for 2013 came true? What surprises hit you?

Having a plan and a framework to focus your thinking is good. That’s why I outlined my three words for this year. Just know that luck plays a role in what the year ahead will bring and be open. Happy 2014!

Happy Holidays. Take time to hit the pause button.

MerryChristmas_lights

There’s a lot riding on the biggest holiday season of the year. For retailers it’s the time to make it or break it. Most wait all year for this day. For individuals, it’s the time where expectations are high and we run frantically, shopping for the right gifts for our family and friends. A day where family dynamics play out – good and bad. Some love this day for the light and sparkle and anticipation it brings.

I was sad to see the Christmas season encroaching more and more on fall. Halloween day saw the Christmas displays going up and ads had started prior. And stores started opening on Thanksgiving for the first time. We’re losing fall and all it brings in the name of commerce.

I heard a story on NPR about the sadness in many of our favorite Christmas songs – like Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas, White Christmas and Home for the Holidays. The lyrics refer to better times in the past and hope for the future because the current times are a little blue. The story talked about how these songs likely bring joy when we’re not feeling down, and I would agree.

As a child, I couldn’t get enough of the lights and the Christmas tree. The more and bigger, the better. Even now, our small family has to have just the right tree. And we MUST cut it down. It’s just not the same otherwise.  It’s not just Christmas day, it’s the process that makes it special. And it is much fun to establish new traditions and share the season with our daughter, who loves every bit of it.

It’s the little things, really. The night before Christmas Eve our new neighbors stopped by with cookies, just to say hi. It was unexpected and so nice and something that’s often lost in many neighborhoods. It’s that sense of community that makes us feel more connected and the season more special.

So take time from your busyness and be present with those closest to you. Find little moments out of the chaos, pause and smile. All the best!